Website of the Week: SCOTUS Nominee Elena Kagan in the Library of Congress - GovernmentVideo.com

Website of the Week: SCOTUS Nominee Elena Kagan in the Library of Congress

The range of topics covered by special Web pages at the Library of Congress is astounding.
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The range of topics covered by special Web pages at the Library of Congress is astounding. Barely a day goes by without some new feature on a topic of American or international life, science, commerce or history, from the trivial and obscure to the fundamental issues of the day.

In the fundamental issues department we have a collection of resources on U.S. Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan.

The consensus in the media seems to be that Kagan hasn't left much of a paper trail in her legal career, the better with which to deny her opponents ammunition to block her confirmation.

But what there is, is here, in a section of the LoC's website devoted to Supreme Court nominees.

A lot of it won't tell you much about her future actions on the court, should she be confirmed. For example, you can find news clips and video talking about how there's not much of a record. There's also her actual work--transcripts of her oral arguments before the high court made as U.S. Solicitor General, for example.

But there are links to papers she's written, and commentary about her, from the just-the-facts context of C-SPAN to a blog that blames Obama for the Deepwater Horizon/British Petroleum oil spill. The Library doesn't judge, just puts it out there.

Unfortunately, more people will listen to pundits of their own ideological stripe than will seek out the complete record. But for those who want to learn a little more than cable news can provide, the LoC is there… and its page on Elena Kagan is the Government Video Website of the Week!

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