Website of the Week: CrimeMapping.com

Now you can check out recent crime data from a growing number of cities and counties, with colorful incident-coded graphics on street maps.
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Many police departments provide crime mapping, e-mail and text notifications, online scanner audio, and similar tools to help citizens learn more about what's happening on the streets.

CrimeMapping.com takes the data from a whole lot of cities and counties and lays it out graphically in maps. Now you can check out recent crime data from a growing number of cities and counties, with colorful incident-coded graphics on street maps.

It makes spotting crime areas easy, almost too easy. Want to know how sleepy or lively a certain neighborhood is? CrimeMapping alerts you to burglaries, DUIs, assaults, noise complaints and several more types of episodes in seconds.

California is leading the charge in adopting the technology, with the notable exception of Los Angeles. But San Francisco, Oakland and several other populous jurisdictions are. Major cities are slow to join: There's no New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Houston or Chicago, and Eastern states have very few participants.

The ease of the access to this information will no doubt bring a whole set of issues. Crime isn't reported the same way in all places, so folks could unwittingly use this for apples-to-oranges comparison. And will people be so ready to make noise complaints if it slaps a white exclamation point on a yellow background (the icon for a noise call) on the site's map of their street?

Still, it's a whole lot of current and useful information... so crimemapping.com is the Government Video Website of the Week!

Got a great government Website? Tell us at stalwani@nbmedia.com.

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