More Siqura Fiber to Help Manage Traffic in Remote Parts of South Carolina

The SCDOT traffic network primarily uses Siqura high-density CWDM transmitters to send video and data over a single fiber to the traffic control center in Columbia
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South Carolina’s extensive traffic management system is expanding to cover rural areas.

The system’s network of cameras, automated recorders and sensors already provide real-time information on rapidly changing traffic volumes and speeds, weather data, and evacuation route information in the event of a hurricane.

The system is expanding, and its using Siqura 9000 series fiber components from Germantown, Md.-based Optelecom-NKF Inc., which was awarded a $503,000 contract from Temple, Inc., a regional systems distributor based in Decatur, Ala., for the system.

For more than seven years, Optelecom-NKF has provided numerous fiber solutions to Temple for the SCDOT’s comprehensive ITS network build-out.

The system also utilizes variable message sign (VMS) technology and links to an array of media, such as the Internet and radio broadcasts, to keep the public up-to-date on road congestion and travel conditions.

“I’m pleased that Temple, Inc., and the SCDOT continue to turn to Optelecom-NKF for solutions that help improve public safety and manage South Carolina’s outlying highways and roads network,” said Dave Patterson, Optelecom-NKF’s president and CEO. “This contract underscores the strong position we’ve established in the ITS market and highlights the flexibility and reliability of our products in a wide range of applications.”

While traffic cameras and signals as well as sensors, such as loop devices, are made to bear the wear and tear of varied weather and highway situations, the diverse range of contraptions designed to convey the collected information often buckle under the rugged circumstances, and equipment failures recurrently plagued the SCDOT in its traffic system’s early years.

Fully aware of their customer’s difficulties, Temple started testing an assortment of field-hardened fiber-optic transmission equipment that could endure the severe conditions in which it was to be installed. In 2003, Temple discovered Optelecom-NKF’s line of advanced IP and fiber-video surveillance solutions. Intrigued by the wide temperature range in which Optelecom-NKF’s fiber optic transmitter and receiver solutions can operate (-40° F to +165° F), Temple commissioned Optelecom-NKF to provide the SCDOT with dependable devices that would ensure a consistent and unfailing flow of traffic information.

The SCDOT traffic network primarily uses Siqura high-density CWDM transmitters to send video and data over a single fiber to the traffic control center in Columbia, where operators monitor the traffic situation and manage the electronic signs and traffic advisory reports can be generated.

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