LAPD Selects Axis Network Cameras to Secure Red Carpet at the 2014 Academy Awards

The *real* best picture at the Oscars
Author:
Publish date:
Image placeholder title

Axis P5534-E PTZ dome network camera outside the red carpet area

CHELMSFORD, Mass. – Axis Communications, a manufacturer of surveillance cameras and systems, recently announced the the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) selected a mix of HDTV-quality pan/tilt/zoom Axis network cameras to provide video security and live situational awareness along the red carpet at the Academy Awards on March 2.

The LAPD’s requirement for reliable security technology is essential to protecting high profile events such as the Academy Awards. The red carpet scene is one of the most popular entertainment spectacles of the year, and viewers from across the globe tune in to watch the media interview and photograph their favorite celebrities as they arrive in style wearing clothing and jewelry worth hundreds of thousands of dollars. The LAPD used Axis IP cameras and software connected via a wireless mesh network to provide the necessary support to help keep the night glamorous, fun, and incident-free.

“What I appreciate most about the Axis camera system and software is that we no longer have to think about the technology or how to use its capability. High-quality resolution, video storage that is searchable and retrievable helps us best leverage our resources”, said Deputy Chief Michael Downing, commanding officer for counter terrorism and special operations bureau, Los Angeles Police Department.

Axis’ PTZ cameras were strategically placed in the block surrounding the Dolby Theatre and connected back to the command center at the police headquarters seven miles away in downtown Los Angeles. With the cameras managed remotely through Axis Camera Companion software, the LAPD had an easily deployable, temporary solution to ensure the safety of Hollywood megastars waving to the world on their way to the event.

Video Surveillance: Beyond Hollywood Magic

Despite what movies and television often show, the ability of a computer lab technician to magically enhance poor quality video with software is vastly overstated. In the real world, it’s paramount that the surveillance cameras capture the best possible video for image usability. Faced with a number of challenges that include large crowds, variable outdoor lighting conditions, camera flashes and the fact that red is one of the hardest colors for video to render, the LAPD chose IP cameras that could overcome these challenges, capture the best possible images and ensure the video was reliably recorded and readily accessible.

This meant the LAPD needed HD surveillance cameras with responsive pan/tilt/zoom functionality, ability to handle a wide dynamic range of lighting (WDR), power-over-Ethernet connectivity and on-camera SD card edge storage. Camera placement was also critical, and the LAPD combined comprehensive, wide angle overhead views with additional dedicated cameras at high risk zones throughout the area. With this set up, officers on the ground could relay any suspicious activity back to police headquarters so commanders could zoom in and provide instant support.

For the job, the LAPD chose HDTV 1080p Axis Q6035-E PTZ dome network cameras and HDTV 720p Axis P3354-E PTZ dome network cameras. Each outdoor-ready camera was connected to a wireless mesh node housed inside a custom-built watertight enclosure. The edge-based Axis Camera Companion software running inside the camera network allowed commanders the ability to select, control and view all cameras wirelessly on 70-inch display monitors at City Hall, as well as access the recorded video.

“With all the TV cameras, world-famous celebrities and expensive wardrobes packed into a single city block, the LAPD had an incredibly tough job,” said Fredrik Nilsson, general manager, Axis Communications, Inc. “We’re proud the high-quality images and flexible installation opportunities offered by Axis network cameras allowed the LAPD to provide the top-notch security needed for such a high-profile event.”

Related