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Ireland Inks Speed Camera Deal - GovernmentVideo.com

Ireland Inks Speed Camera Deal

 Australian cam system provider Redflex has a 16 percent stake in the GoSafe Consortium.
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Irish officials and a private consortium have signed five-year contract to deploy 45 mobile speed enforcement cameras.

Australian cam system provider Redflex has a 16 percent stake in the GoSafe Consortium, which was awarded the €65 million ($97 million) contract.

Redflex said it would provide its camera systems and Image and Infringement Processing System (IIPS), which “efficiently processes large volumes of infractions and caters for flexible business requirements,” the company said.

Other GoSafe stakeholders are the Irish Company Spectra and the French company EGIS Projects SA.

GoSafe will headquarter in Listowel, County Kerry, on the west coast of Ireland.

The program will involve a fleet of cars with speed camera systems (the Irish Times pegged the number at 45) based at 15 depots.

The Irish Garda already uses eight mobile cameras in vans, 400 hand-held speeding devices and more than 100 automatic number plate recognition cameras, the Times reported.

The locations of many of the cameras would be posted on the Garda Website, according to the Times.

Redflex has contracts for enforcement cameras with 250 United States cities, with speed programs in nine states and red light programs in 21 states.

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