GV Expo: How VR and AR Can Impact Government Reach

"Getting Real: How Augmented & Virtual Reality Expand Your Reach" is on Thursday, Dec 8th at 10:15 AM
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"Getting Real: How Augmented & Virtual Reality Expand Your Reach" is on Thursday, Dec 8th at 10:15 AM
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On Thursday, December 8th from 10:15-11:00 AM, Government Video Expoand the Producers Guild of America (PGA) present "Getting Real: How Augmented & Virtual Reality Expand Your Reach."

Virtual reality (VR) has had a long lifecycle as a technology for medical, military, and advanced videogame research and development. But VR has advanced to a true consumer product level, expanding beyond augmented reality (AR) applications, glasses, and headsets to power experiences that are compelling and immersive. The Consumer Technology Association (CTA) estimates that 1.2 million VR headsets will be sold in the US in 2016, and estimates that, by 2020, the overall VR market will be somewhere between $50-150 billion. As VR content moves onto mobile devices and cost-effective headsets at an increasing pace, producers will be in greater demand for new forms of immersive storytelling.

So how can these tools be used effectively to reach your core constituency? Imagine a citizen being able to visualize in the real world where a government plans to build a new bridge, road or transit station. Where workers can have manuals, expert advice, maps and diagrams directly in their peripheral vision. Or where anyone can experience (and therefore understand) the outbreak of a deadly disease like Ebola.

Join a panel of VR makers, journalists, and industry insiders for a thought-provoking and insightful conversation about the past, present and future of this “new” technology.

This panel, as well as all panels at the Government Video Theater, are free and open to all attendees of Government Video Expo.

Register here.


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GV Expo: VR Provides a New Way to Look at Data

Perhaps inspecting a virtualized fly’s brain wasn’t the first thing that came to mind when the staff at the University of Virginia’s Advanced Research Computing Service department purchased its virtual reality equipment, but it certainly fit the intended goal.