Graphics Catch the Eye and Add Pizzazz

These tools can help you dress up your government television production
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The Ross XPression product family includes real-time motion graphics systems, clip servers, workflow tools and purpose-built software applications.

TV graphics systems have come a long way from being “just” character generators. Today, in addition to creating eye-catching titles, TV graphics systems can provide 2D and 3D still images, full motion animations and even virtual sets that make a green-screen closet studio look like the bridge of the USS Enterprise.

Here are some tools available to government video producers from some of the biggest names in the business.

ChyronHego

With its purchases of Newsroom Solutions (maker of data-driven NewsTicker) and VidiGo (IT-based graphics and production workflow solutions), ChyronHego has positioned itself to cover all aspects of TV graphics production. “We’ve integrated all of these elements into our end-to-end BlueNet graphics creation and playout system,” said Juan Gonzalez, ChyronHego’s director of strategic sales. “We can deliver everything from software-based graphics solutions to full turnkey systems.”

ChyronHego introduced a number of additions to its BlueNet family at the 2015 IBC Show in September. They include Lyric64, Paint 6.1 and Channel Box Prime among others.

Lyric64 is ChyronHego’s all-new graphics and playout platform. A 64-bit application, Lyric64 is meant to provide users with a one-stop solution for making and presenting graphics content. It comes with an updated user interface including point-and-click data access using ChyronHego’s Advanced Data Object technology. Lyric64 is also resolution-agnostic for rendering and playing 4K (and higher) resolution graphics in a range of aspect ratios.

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Dash 1000 is part of Compix' new line of TV graphics generation systems.

Paint 6.1, the latest version of ChyronHego’s telestration solution, supports 4K productions and can be integrated with EVS systems. With Paint 6.1, government video producers can telestrate a 4K stream in an HD broadcast without loss in resolution. It is now available for Mac as well as Windows.

ChyronHego’s Paint Live allows live producers to telestrate fill and key output. Meanwhile, Paint Offline lets ChyronHego users create graphics on their laptops anywhere, at any time and from any location.

Finally, ChyronHego’s Channel Box channel-branding system has been redone for 64-bit and released under the name Channel Box Prime. It features an all-new dedicated rendering engine and scene designer, plus Warp Effects, a new special effect that integrates with other vendors’ modeling and rendering tools such as Adobe After Effects and 3ds Max from Autodesk.

Compix Media

Dash, Compix Broadcast Graphics’ new TV graphics generation system, “is designed to easily integrate data with pre-made templates,” according to Timothy Reyes, Compix Media’s director of products. “Our goal is to make it easy for broadcasters to create and playout a full range of graphics and animations, through a wide range of products.”

Compix Media’s Dash family certainly offers variety. Specifically, it comes in two layers with multiple offerings in each. The first layer is Dash’s standalone line that comes with its own dedicated, rackmounted hardware boxes. Dash 1000 and Dash 4100 both support one TV channel of graphics either in tandem with switchers as standalones with internal keying. Dash 4100 can be upgraded to handle two channels, while Dash 4200 offers the same functionality for two channels.

The second layer is Compix Media’s graphics for use with NewTek Tricaster’s integrated video production systems. The software-only Dash 80 runs on a user-supplied computer connected to the Tricaster. Dash 150 is the same product but comes with its own 1RU rackmountable computer box.

“With our systems, you can do a full range of TV graphics, including bugs and multiple layers,” Reyes said. “From the Dash 80 to the Dash 4200, we cover all areas of the government video production market.”

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Lyric 64 is among the notable additions to the ChyronHego BlueNet family.

Ross Video

XPression, a sophisticated line of graphics systems from Ross Video, “is much more than a character generator,” according to Patrick Twomey, marketing product manager, technical, for XPression.

“The XPression product family includes real-time motion graphics systems, clip servers, workflow tools and purpose-built software applications, all aimed to let you put together highly-polished video productions with easy-to-use software and equipment,” he said.

At the 2015 NAB Show, Ross announced new features for XPression 6.0, including XPression 4K, which supports graphics creation and playout of 4K programming. Meanwhile, the new XPression Clips server allows operators to combine workflows for live production, clips and real-time graphics onto the same platform, supporting instant recall times for stored content and back-to-back transitions from one clip to another.

At the IBC Show in September, the company unveiled XPression’s Trackless Studio function. Building on XPression’s virtual setmaking capability — the system comes with six ready-to-use virtual sets, plus the ability to create custom designs — Twomey said Trackless Studio “allows users to make dramatic camera moves such as crane or jib shots, use multiple cameras and add live inputs, real-time 3D graphics, clips and stills.”

What makes Trackless Studio stand out is that these motions are done using fixed physical cameras in the virtual studio space. “The actual moves are mapped and generated using Trackless Studio’s virtual cameras within the XPression virtual set,” Twomey said.

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