Comments Sought on States’ Telecommunications Relay Service Renewal Applications - GovernmentVideo.com

Comments Sought on States’ Telecommunications Relay Service Renewal Applications

Forty-eight states, the District of Columbia, two U.S. territories seek TRS program renewal
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The U.S. Federal Communications Commission is seeking comment on telecommunications relay service renewal applications filed by 48 states, the District of Columbia and two U.S. territories.
On March 12, the FCC posted a Federal Register notice—Pleading Cycle Established for Comment on Applications for State Certification for the Provision of Telecommunications Relay Service—that says, the current TRS certifications for the 48 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. territories of Puerto Rico and Saipan are set to expire July 25, and renewal applications have been filed.
Alaska and West Virginia are the only states that are not on the FCC’s list of state applicants seeking renewed certification of their TRS programs. The FCC received a partial TRS renewal application from Alaska, but has not received applications from West Virginia or the U.S. Virgin Islands, also a U.S. territory, says a commission official.
When those states and the territory file completed applications, the FCC will issue another request for comments, the commission official says.
The applications must “demonstrate” to the FCC that the applicant’s TRS program complies with U.S. laws covering disability access and with the FCC’s TRS rules, the Federal Register notice says. In addition, because TRS certifications for the states and territories are set to expire July 25, TRS certification renewals would begin July 26, 2013 and run for five years through July 25, 2018, the FCC says.
Comments can be filed through March 15, and reply comments can be filed through March 29.
Click here to read the Federal Register notice.

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