Arizona to End Highway Speed Camera Program

The state Department of Public Safety will turn the cameras off July 15 and is ending its contract with Redflex.
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Arizona's speed camera system--one of the most aggressive and controversial in the nation--is ending this summer.

The state Department of Public Safety will turn the cameras off July 15 and is ending its contract with Redflex Holdings Ltd., which is taking an estimated $5 million write-down because of the move.

The program, initiated by then-Gov. Janet Napolitano, never achieved the revenue backers had expected, and the majority of tickets never got paid. The cameras also provoked some public backlash. One Redflex employee was shot and killed on the job, and several cameras have been vandalized.

Critics of the program have threatened to bring the matter to the ballot box, and CameraFRAUD, a group that opposes the cameras, said it's not time to celebrate yet.

"The cameras can come back at any time, and we need to get those signatures necessary to put the intitiative [sic] on the ballot this November!" the group wrote on its blog.

The move affects about 80 fixed and mobile cameras on highways; it does not affect enforcement cameras on city streets.

Australia-based Redflex, which had previously warned its stockholders of uncertainty in the Arizona program, remains the largest supplier of enforcement cameras in the United States.

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