Air and Space Museum Holding Virtual Moon Landing Conference

The Apollo Space Program Virtual Conference for Educators will be a free one-day online program.
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The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum will hold its first virtual conference Tues., Nov. 10, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., to discuss the remarkable technologies that made the moon landings possible and the challenges the program faced.

The Apollo Space Program Virtual Conference for Educators will be a free one-day online program with curators from the museum’s Space History Division.

The conference will feature six sessions: Placing Apollo in Historical Context; Getting to the Moon: Apollo Technology; Presidents, Politics, Social Climate; Apollo Artifacts; Apollo Imagery and Its Place in Modern American Society; and Remembering Apollo. The program will include sessions of general interest and sessions for secondary teachers with ties to the NASA History Advanced Placement and Human Geography Advanced Placement projects. All the conference sessions will be recorded, archived and available for future reference.

To register for the conference go to www.learningtimes.net/apollo.

The conference is funded by NASA.

For a report on the National Air and Space Museum's newest galleries, click here or check out the October issue of Government Video.

For a special report on the the live broadcast of the Apollo 11 moon landing in 1969, click here.

Follow Government Video on Twitter: www.twitter.com/governmentvideo.

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