Washington Post Weighs in on DC’s Camera Enforcement Surge

Washington, D.C., is getting some backlash from residents and commuters for its aggressive plan to help tackle the city’s fiscal problems with revenue from traffic tickets. And the Washington Post now suggests the capitol of the free world is also becoming a leaders in writing tickets, and is looking for more. Accor
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Washington, D.C., is getting some backlash from residents and commuters for its aggressive plan to help tackle the city’s fiscal problems with revenue from traffic tickets. And the Washington Post now suggests the capitol of the free world is also becoming a leader in writing tickets, and is looking for more.

According to the Post story, DC parking enforcement officers wrote about half as many tickets in the District (population 600,000) as Los Angeles’ enforcers write in a city of 4 million.

What’s more, Mayor Adrian M. Fenty’s budget proposal for Fiscal Year 2010 would including attaching cameras to street sweepers to issue another 237,000 of the $30 parking tickets in fiscal 2010. The cameras will take pictures of vehicles that have not been moved for street cleanings, and the city will mail $30 tickets to violators.

But the DC ticketers may be working too well; citizens have complained about receiving tickets for times when they were in the car with an expired meter, as well as tickets issued before DC’s rush hour restrictions kick in at 4 p.m., but which falsely claimed a rush-hour violation.

As previously noted here, the District plans to expand red-light, speeding and anti-gridlock enforcement cameras as part of its fiscal plans.

Read the Post story here.

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