Goffstown TV Covering Sports With JVC Cams

Goffstown TV was able to improve its workflow and more than triple its local coverage of hockey and other sports with the JVC GY-HM200SP sports production streaming camcorder.

GOFFSTOWN, NH–New JVC GY-HM200SP sports production streaming camcorders acquired by the PEG operator Goffstown TV are simplifying its local sports productions and in turn allowing the channel to cover more games, according to Adam McCune, cable coordinator at GTV.

“Our workflow was cumbersome at best,” he admitted. Before the cameras, for example, covering football games required two cameras–one covering game action while the other locks onto a scoreboard shot–that then required the two shots be synced together and edited in post-production. A four-day turnaround time with that setup was considered timely, McCune said.

Because the GY-HM200SP’s have a built-in real-time graphics overlay function that can either be recorded or streamed without the use of an external CG or production switcher, McCune no longer has to use a second camera to cover a scoreboard, let alone sync cameras in post-production.

McCune says the cameras have allowed him to have a taping of a soccer match “that ended at 6 PM and have the game replayed on GTV in less than 45 minutes.” Another example of the impact the JVC cams have had on Goffstown TV’s production output is, before the cameras, coverage of nine sporting events were produced in the Fall of 2015, then after acquiring the GY-HM200SP, 29 contests were produced during the same timeframe in the fall of 2016.

GTV production setups vary by sports. Football games usually require a four-person crew of one camera operator, two commentators and a scorekeeper who updates the score and clock data manually with an iPad. McCune creates custom team overlays using Photoshop and JVC’s SDP Generator software before each game.

McCune said viewers of GTV’s two Comcast channels have noticed the improved production quality, with some even comparing the sports broadcasts to ones they see on national and regional networks. “They see our graphics at the same level of what they’re used to,” he added, “and that’s a huge thing for public access. I think the graphics are great.”

Share This Post